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Join us for Café Scientifique

Interested in science? Want to learn more about the latest technology breakthroughs in normal English, minus the jargon? Then Café Scientifique Pittsburgh at Carnegie Science Center is the place to be!

Café Sci is THE place in Pittsburgh where anyone interested in science can get together at a scientific hub to discuss today's science issues with experts, and best of all... you can ask your own questions! After a brief talk by our monthly guest speaker, the evening is dedicated to a question-and-answer session. Plus, enjoy our pub-type atmosphere with food and drinks available for purchase.


3/4/2017 to 10/8/2019

Join us for Café Scientifique on Mon., Oct. 7

Presenter:

Peter C. Gerszten Peter C. Gerszten, MD, MPH, FACS
Peter E. Sheptak Professor of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

The Paleopathology of South American Mummies

Paleopathology — the study of ancient diseases — provides us with a better understanding of how our ancestors lived and what caused them to die. Some of the best paleopathological investigations have resulted from the discovery of mummified remains associated with pre-Columbian Andean cultures in southern Peru and northern Chile. The vast majority of these naturally dried bodies are complete, and in many cases the internal organs are intact.

Dr. Peter Gerszten has been fascinated with paleopathology from an early age, often accompanying his father Dr. Enrique Gerszten (a pioneer in the field) to South America to conduct field work. His interest in skulls, including deformation and trephination, ultimately led him to pursue the field of neurosurgery. Dr. Gerszten first came to Pittsburgh complete a residency in Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, where he now serves as the Peter E. Sheptak Professor of Neurological Surgery.

This talk will introduce the field of paleopathology, the methods employed to study the diseases of ancient remains, and the medical findings of those who lived thousands of years ago in South America.


Time: Doors open at 6 pm, and the program is 7–9 pm.
Location: Carnegie Science Center
Admission: FREE!
Parking: $5
Cash bar: Open from 6–7:30 pm

Although this event is free, we ask that you register opens in a new window so that we can prepare the room and have enough food available for purchase.

A la carte menu:

  • Pre-made deli sandwiches and salads
  • Chips and cookies
  • Bottled Beverages
  • Beer and wine

Register here for Café Scientifique

8/6/2018 to 9/3/2019

Join us for Café Scientifique on Mon., Sept. 2

Presenter:

Zolt Levay Zolt Levay
Photographer, Hubble Space Telescope

Visualizing Hubble’s Colorful Universe

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has been exploring the cosmos for nearly 30 years. In that time, it has revolutionized astronomy with numerous groundbreaking discoveries, but Hubble has also enabled us to reimagine our perception of the universe through a wealth of spectacular, dramatic views of space in unprecedented detail. On Sept. 2, join Zolt Levay, a photographer involved with several space missions at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, as he describes some of the most powerful images in Hubble’s gallery and how science data can be translated into colorful pictures.

Zolt Levay has been pursuing astronomy and photography throughout his career. As far back as high school, he was observing the sky and taking photographs through a home-built telescope and processing photographs in a home darkroom. Levay earned a degree in astronomy and worked with several space science missions at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. For over 35 years, he was professionally involved with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope mission at the Space Telescope Science Institute. For most of that time, he was responsible for translating science data into images and graphics that illustrate Hubble’s discoveries for the public and balancing science content with aesthetics.

He produced some of the most remarkable, profound, and widely distributed Hubble images and has described this work in public talks, magazine articles, books, and documentaries. Levay has also pursued a wide range of photographic interests, exhibited in galleries, and won awards in photography competitions. Currently, he is working on personal photography projects including seeking out dark, clear skies to explore the relationships between landscapes, the night sky, and the cosmos.


Time: Doors open at 6 pm, and the program is 7–9 pm.
Location: Carnegie Science Center
Admission: FREE!
Parking: $5
Cash bar: Open from 6–7:30 pm

Although this event is free, we ask that you register opens in a new window so that we can prepare the room and have enough food available for purchase.

A la carte menu:

  • Pre-made deli sandwiches and salads
  • Chips and cookies
  • Bottled Beverages
  • Beer and wine

Register here for Café Scientifique

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